Meet Our Therapists

Psychology Interns & Postgraduate Fellows

WILA’s excellent training programs attract an impressively bright, curious, and motivated group of students. Since our founding, over 600 graduate students, interns, and postgraduate fellows have studied at WILA and become exceedingly competent and compassionate mental health professionals.

Trevor Alleman, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Trevor is a doctoral candidate at Fuller Graduate School of Psychology. He has completed specialized training in MBT (Mentalization Based Therapy) and draws from a wide range of psychoanalytic theories. He has previously trained at Greenhouse Therapy Center and Fuller Psychological and Family Services in Pasadena, CA. Trevor is particularly interested in how culture and spirituality inform identity development. His ultimate goal is to help others become more curious about their own minds and the minds of others.

Sophie Davis-Cohen, MSW

Postgraduate Fellow

Sophie received her Master’s in Clinical Social Work from Smith College in 2015, and has worked in various settings with adults and teenagers dealing with a range of presenting concerns. Sophie feels that telling one’s story in a trusting relationship is a process that enriches life, and allows for healing and psychological growth. Sophie draws from psychodynamic and attachment theories, which guide the relationally embedded experience of therapy. She is also passionate about meditation as a process supporting mind/body insight and connection.

Dawn Glover, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Dawn is a doctoral candidate at California School of Professional Psychology in Los Angeles. Her experience includes working with adults who are struggling with depression, anxiety, identity, loss and grief, and experiences of trauma. Dawn’s approach to therapy draws from attachment and object relations theories, dialectical behavior theory, and LGBTQ Affirmative therapy. She works with couples and individuals to understand how their early experiences impact their current relationships, emotions, behaviors, and thoughts, and to helps them utilize this understanding to enhance their quality of life and relationships with self and other.

Joshua Goldstein, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Joshua is a doctoral candidate at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles. He has previously trained at Maple Counseling Center and The Chicago School Counseling Center, working with adults and college aged individuals. He believes that the therapeutic relationship between therapist and patient plays an important role in the treatment and works primarily from an object-relations perspective.

Margaret Hickman, LMFT

Psychology Intern

Margaret is a doctoral candidate at Pacifica Graduate Institute, and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She believes therapy is a unique opportunity to know yourself and to become a more authentic, creative and engaged person. She finds that psychotherapy can help you to understand how your past effects your thinking, emotions, actions and beliefs. By doing your inner work, therapy helps to overcome repetitive patterns, critical thoughts and creative blocks. Margaret works primarily from psychoanalytic object relations and attachment theories, and is passionate about working with individuals, couples and families to help foster curiosity, compassion, and openness to create meaningful connections, a sense of belonging and deep fulfilment.

Shemetra James, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Shemetra is a doctoral candidate at Antioch University Santa Barbara. She previously trained at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Hillmont House-ANKA Behavioral Health, Tarzana Treatment Center, and Airport Marina Counseling Center. She recognizes your experiences are unique, has an empathetic approach, and is passionate about helping others embrace their own identities through self-empowerment. Shemetra follows Psychodynamic, Psychoanalytic, Object Relations, Cognitive-Behavioral theories, and Humanistic approaches to therapy. Her special area of interest is forgiveness practices to help overcome trauma.

Dana Jebreel, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Dana received her doctorate degree in clinical psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology. She has experience working with adults, adolescents, and families, and has a particular interest in helping individuals work through trauma, family and trans-generational, identity, spirituality, and relationship difficulties. Dana works from a relational perspective using the therapeutic relationship to facilitate change and foster authentic connection.

Andrea Kane, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Andrea holds a degree in Marital and Family therapy and a doctoral degree from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Andrea draws from psychodynamic and systems theory. Andrea has been involved in clinical research studies and has published on ADHD and has a special interest in the diagnosis and treatment.​

Jennifer Kashani, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Jennifer received her doctoral degree from the California School of Professional Psychology. She is passionate about helping adults navigate life transitions, relationship issues, trauma, anxiety and depression. She strives to create a space to explore feelings without judgment and to use the therapeutic relationship as a vehicle for positive change.

READ MY BLOGS

Kyle Kermott, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Kyle received his doctoral degree from the American School of Professional Psychology, San Francisco Bay Area. He has training working with adults and college-aged individuals on numerous issues such as anxiety and depression, relationship troubles, difficulties related to life transitions, and identity issues. He is passionate about psychoanalytic psychotherapy and working with his patients on discovering a life that feels real and authentic.

Samantha Liberman, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Samantha received her doctoral degree from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles. She has previously trained at The Chicago School Counseling Center, Hillsides Full Service Program, and The Achievable Foundation working primarily with adolescents and adults. She is passionate about working with patients utilizing psychodynamic and object-relational theories.

Marcia Nimmer, Psy.D., LCSW

Psychology Intern

Marcia earned her doctorate at Pacifica Graduate Institute. Her research and writing has focussed upon finding meaning in the second half of life. She is drawn to helping individuals continue to grow and develop throughout the lifespan. Marcia sees post-midlife as time of great potential and wants to help individuals explore and find their full potential and whole selves.

Lindsay O’Shea, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Lindsay is a doctoral candidate at California School of Professional Psychology. She encourages patients to develop an authentic understanding of themselves and to become curious about how their inner world affects their experiences. Drawing from object relations theory and attachment theory, she works with patients to embrace their vulnerability and courage to address a variety of topics including life transitions, identity formation and overcoming loss.

Crystle Prung, Ph.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Crystle received her doctorate from Pacifica Graduate Institute. She has previously trained at Reasons Eating Disorder Center and Orange County Behavioral Health. She is passionate about helping others foster a sense of self-awareness and reaching their highest potential. She desires to create a space that encourages exploration and self-acceptance.

Erica Sanborn, Ph.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Erica received her doctorate from the California School of Professional Psychology. She has training working with adults and college-aged individuals on a variety of presenting concerns such as relationship issues, depression and anxiety, self-esteem concerns, and identity development. She is drawn to attachment theory and is interested in the integration of mental and physical wellness. She is passionate about helping individuals embrace their vulnerability and curiosity so that they can forge meaning and build identity through the sharing of their story.

Raha Salehinia, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Raha is a doctoral candidate at the California School of Professional Psychology. As a first-generation Iranian American immigrant who identifies equally with both cultures, Raha has adopted a strong commitment to fostering knowledge and appreciation of multiculturalism. Her ultimate wish is to embrace differences and live in a diverse society where we unite to promote justice, freedom, love, empathy, and conscious existence. Raha holds an interdisciplinary perspective appreciating traditional Freudian to more modern Lacanian approaches.

Elizabeth Slater, Psy.D.

Postgraduate Fellow

Elizabeth received her doctorate at the California School of Professional Psychology, San Francisco. She has experience working with adults, adolescents, and families on a range of issues, including trauma, substance abuse, depression and anxiety, relationship difficulties, and identity development. Elizabeth is particularly passionate about serving the LGBTQ community and other marginalized groups. She works with her patients from a psychoanalytic lens to help them develop more meaningful and fulfilling lives.

Katherine Smith, M.A.

Psychology Intern

Katherine is a doctoral candidate at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She believes therapy is more than just overcoming life’s challenges – it is an opportunity for you to explore and create a new relationship to your self. Katherine approaches therapy with kindness, compassion, and humor. She has worked with individuals and couples of diverse backgrounds, sexual orientations, mental health concerns, and integrates social justice and feminist perspectives in her approach to therapy.